Sunspotters Relaunched: Help Classify Sunspots!
Sample image of the Sunspotter page


The Sunspotter project is a citizen science project designed to help classify sunspots in order of complexity. By helping to do so, volunteers help solar scientists in their quest to understand how sunspots form and how their complexity relates to the emergence of solar flares. How complex must a sunspot be before a flare erupts from the surface of the Sun? Is there a correlation, and if so, how strongly are flares linked to complex sunspot groups? By classifying these groups of sunspots you will help scientists answer these questions and more!

It is fun and easy to participate in this study! Go to sunspotter.org and click "start ranking" to join. You will then be presented with two groups of sunspots (as shown above). Choose the group that looks more complex by clicking on the picture, and you will be presented with another group of two sunspots to choose from. You can keep choosing sunspots for as long as you want: classify a few sunspots, or  a few hundred. It makes for a fun activity to do over  a lunch break or while sipping on your morning coffee, or in lieu of a video game!



 
Join our vibrant stargazing community!
 
We invite you to join the NASA Night Sky Network stargazing community on Facebook and Twitter for sky charts, beautiful images, and lively conversation. 
 
 
Distant Suns, your personal guide to the cosmos, lists Night Sky Network astronomy club star parties, safe solar gazing events, and lectures in the main navigation bar. Distant Suns is available on iPhone, iPad, Kindle, and NOOK.
 

 
 

 

SkySafari, a powerful planetarium that fits in your pocket, lists Night Sky Network astronomy club star parties, safe solar gazing events, and lectures in the help menu. SkySafari is available for Android and the iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch.



ASP logo

The NASA Night Sky Network is managed by the Astronomical Society of the Pacific.
The ASP is a 501c3 nonprofit organization that advances science literacy through astronomy. Your contribution is tax-deductible as provided by law.